Video: How Stars Destroyed Almost All the Atoms in the Universe

Video: How Stars Destroyed Almost All the Atoms in the Universe

Credit: W.M. Keck Observatory

On Thursday, May 10, 2012, Keck Observatory hosted a live webcast of an astronomy talk by Dr. Brian Siana of the University of California at Riverside. Below is the recording of that talk, which was delivered to a live audience at the Kahilu Theatre in Kamuela-Waimea, Hawaii. 

The first galaxies had an extraordinary impact on the young universe. Their ultraviolet light destroyed nearly all of the atoms in the cosmos. This process, called reionization, had severe consequences for galaxies trying to form thereafter. Unfortunately, we have no idea how it happened. In galaxies today ultraviolet light cannot escape, so the first galaxies must have been very different from those we see today. Dr. Siana will describe the quest to detect these first galaxies and their impact on the early universe.

Filter

Filter by year OR type:

View all

Twitter

On Keck 1, we have UH observers using MOSFIRE. On Keck 2, we have UCD observers using DEIMOS. Sun set 06:54:00pm rise 05:46:00am
UH observers will use MOSFIRE on Keck 1, and UCSC/UCLA observers will use ESI on Keck 2 tonight. Sun set 06:53:00pm rise 05:46:00am
Keck 1 target of opportunity! Detected the afterglow of a rare short-duration gamma ray burst. Extragalactic explosion, caught in the act.
Does this monster have exotic populations of stars at its center? We'll investigate with LRIS tonight. (3/3)
Special target for Keck 1: NGC 4889 is one of the brightest galaxies known and hosts the largest supermassive black hole ever detected (2/3)